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How to Win The Bidding Game In Today’s Competitive Market

real estate bids

You’ve made the decision to buy a home and have put in a few offers, but keep getting outbid. Although this can be frustrating, don’t give up. You can compete in today’s competitive market even if you don’t have the highest bid. For example, we found a house that had only been on the market for one day, but already had offers. The real estate agent told us they were taking bids until noon the following day. We made a full price offer but did not have any contingencies nor inspection requirements. The other bids were above asking price, but they had contingencies and inspection requirements, so the seller went with our offer. When making your offer don’t get too hung up on thinking you need to make one above list price because it’s not always about the sale price.

financing

Tips to win the bidding war without going above budget:

  1. If you are financing, the first thing you need to do is get a pre-approval from a mortgage lender. Sellers want to know that you can actually purchase the home and makes your offer stand out. This also benefits you in determining your budget when making an offer.
  2. Focus on homes at the lower end of your budget. By doing so, gives you a bit of wiggle room when making an offer if you do have to go slightly above the ask price.
  3. In today’s market, it is important to make your “best and final” offer in the beginning. These days, there isn’t much negotiating going on. If it isn’t your best and final, you probably won’t get the house.
  4. If you do find yourself in a situation where you need to offer above list price, consult with your real estate agent and let him/her help you determine a good offer price. Your agent will be able to pull list and sale prices for comparable properties that have sold within the past six or more months. He or she can determine the typical amount above list price, i.e., $5,000, $10,000, etc. that have occurred. You certainly don’t want to pay more than you should and end up with little to no equity in the house because you paid more than the market can bear.
offer on listing

Get your financing in place, work with a knowledgeable real estate agent, do your homework and you will get that home! For all your real estate needs, contact  Stutesman Action Realty today!

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First Time Home Buying

The real estate market continues to be at the top of financial news with headlines ranging from supply shortages and rising interest rates. Although housing affordability continues to be a major challenge for buyers, a bit of good news is that first time homebuyers were responsible for 29% of sales in February, a 2% increase from the prior month. Are you thinking of joining the nearly 30% of homebuyers, but aren’t sure where to start? Buying a home can seem like a daunting task, especially if you are a first-time homebuyer. Don’t worry just follow these steps and you will be living in your new home before you know it.

real estate market
  • Check your credit score to determine whether you qualify for a mortgage and the interest rate lenders will offer. You are entitled to an annual free credit report, go to AnnualCreditReport.com. Also, from now until the end of the year, the government is allowing a weekly credit report, so take full advantage of this free service. Take this time to review the report and fix any errors or issues.
budget
  • Determine your budget and what you are comfortable with. Just because you may qualify for more, doesn’t mean it is right for you. Most buyers prefer not to be “married to a house payment” so they can travel and do other things.
mortage
  • Find a trusted mortgage lender to get the best mortgage and mortgage rate. Once you are approved, a mortgage lender can give you a preapproval letter. A preapproval letter is a great tool when purchasing a home, because it lets real estate agents and sellers know you are serious and can give you an edge over other buyers that aren’t as prepared.
trusted
  • Choose a real estate agent that will help you find the perfect home that meets your needs within your budget. Once you’ve decided on a home, an agent will guide you through the entire process from negotiation to the final closing process.
real estate agent tips
  • Tips to help your real estate agent find the perfect home:
    • What is important to you? Schools? Nearby recreational activities?
    • Will this be a starter home or a forever home?
    • Do you want to be within walking distance of amenities such as parks or grocery stores?
    • Do you want to live in a neighborhood or prefer to have a larger lot?

First time home buying doesn’t have to be scary. Just follow the steps above and find real estate professionals that you can trust to help you throughout the entire process. Stutesman’s Action Realty can help you with all your real estate needs in Missouri and Kansas. Call today, 833.286.8400.

For more information about current housing statistics, visit the National Association of Realtorsâ.

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Join Us for Our First Time Home Buyers Seminar

Join Us for Our First Time Home Buyers Seminar

Has it been your dream to own your first home? Think it isn’t attainable? Well, my friends, we want to show you how easy it is! Buying a home for the first time can be terrifyingly intimidating—there’s so much to learn! Start with the basics. In this information-packed seminar, you will find out what every first-time home buyer needs to know to dive into house hunting with confidence. Join Stutesman’s Action Realty for this informative program. Let us help you make better financial decisions by understanding the purchase process, along with the benefits of having a Realtor as your step-by-step professional. There will also be mortgage companies and lenders, insurance professionals and title companies on hand to answer questions. You’ll learn about the entire home buying process, how to qualify, what loans and programs are available, how to prepare for home ownership, what to know about the local market, the escrow process (it’s really not that scary!) and so much more! CHOOSE THE LOCATION AND DATE THAT WORKS BEST FOR YOU! PLEASE REGISTER BY SIGNING UP ON OUR FACEBOOK PAGE, EMAILING DIANE EARLL AT DIANE@DIANEEARLL.COM OR CALL 833-286-8400 BEFORE FRIDAY, APRIL 5TH, 2019. Tuesday, April 9th, 2019 5:30 – 7:30 pm Nate’s Place 750 South National Fort Scott, KS 66701 Thursday, April 11th, 2019 5:30 – 7:30 pm FCS Financial Building 1925 N Osage Nevada Mo. 64772

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30 Things Home Inspectors Examine

30 Things Home Inspectors Examine

What does a home inspection involve? Standards and specifics vary from state to state, but in general, the inspector is responsible for making sure there are no glaring, obvious issues with a home that’s being bought or sold. Sellers can hire an inspector before listing the home to ensure they tackle anything major before putting it on the market, and a buyer’s mortgage loan will almost always require a home inspection so that the lender can feel confident that the home is in good shape and habitable. There are dozens of features that a home inspector will examine to ensure the home’s safety and habitability. Here are some of the things you can expect your inspector to look at — if it’s at all possible, it’s always best for a buyer to be present during the inspection so that the inspector can explain any issues in person and so the buyer can ask questions (although it’s usually best to wait until the inspection has concluded before you bombard the inspector with queries). Puddles or standing water outside The inspector will check outside the home for a number of things, including whether there are any puddles or standing water that could indicate a drainage problem. Water is an element that can wreak havoc on a home, and standing water or puddles are a sign that there could be water damage inside the house, or that the foundation is faulty. Sheds If there are sheds or other storage buildings on the property, the inspector will take a look at those to ensure they are safe — no crooked or leaning walls, solidly built, and with doors that open and shut smoothly. After all, you don’t want a shed falling down on top of you while you try to stash your lawn tools. Pathways, retaining walls, and fences Any pathways to and from the house, retaining walls, or fences should be inspected to ensure that they are in good shape; buckling in a pathway, or a leaning retaining wall or fence, could be other indications that the ground underneath the house isn’t entirely stable, and that’s a red flag for inspectors. Decks and patios In addition to making sure that decks and patios don’t have any holes or aren’t skewed in a dangerous way, inspectors will take a look at the railings on your decks and patios to determine how safe they are. Decks or patios without railings or with large gaps in the railings might need to be repaired, and it’s the inspector’s job to check them out and decide whether they meet safety requirements or not. Trees and shrubs Inspectors aren’t arborists, but they’ll still take a look at the trees and shrubs on the property and check for any obvious issues; if there are branches overhanging the roof or falling off a tree, or it looks like it’s about to come down on top of the house or the driveway, the inspector will note the safety hazard in the inspection notes, and it will probably need to be addressed before sale. The foundation A cracked or shifting foundation can mean big trouble for a house, so expect your inspector to spend some time taking a look at the foundation and determining whether it’s stable — and dry, too; a wet foundation means there could be water seeping in (or out) from somewhere, which could potentially undermine the home’s stability in the future. Mold and mildew Not all mold or mildew is toxic, but in general, it’s best not to try to cohabit with spores, which can irritate lungs and trigger allergies. And some mold and mildew is toxic, which poses its own set of problems. Inspectors will look in several places in the home (notably the foundation and attic) to see if there are any signs of mold or mildew present. Basements and crawl spaces Basements and crawl spaces are areas that can be subject to both moisture damage and pests, so inspectors will check for signs that either moisture or pests are present, but the inspector will also look for adequate ventilation, ensure that any exposed pipes are insulated, and check to make sure the insulation is sufficient. Attics The attic is a part of the house that can show if there’s damage to the roof or leakage from outside, so inspectors will spend some time looking for evidence of moisture or water seepage, including stains that might indicate water penetration. There shouldn’t be any open electrical splices or plumbing, exhaust, or appliance vents that terminate in the attic, so inspectors will look for those, too; there also needs to be adequate ventilation and sufficient insulation that’s been appropriately installed in the attic. Windows and door frames Windows and door frames can be places where foundation issues emerge, so inspectors are going to make sure that the windows and door frames are straight — not askew or bowed in any way — and will also check the caulking and glazing on the windows, in addition to ensuring that the window glass isn’t broken and is the appropriate type for the climate and area. The roof Depending on how tall the house in question is, the inspector might or might not actually get up on the roof to look for signs of damage or any problems — if the home is three stories high or taller, then the inspector might use binoculars and other tools to make the best assessment possible from the ground. They’ll use different criteria depending on the roof material, but in general, they’ll want to make sure there aren’t any holes, that there isn’t any decay, look for stains, and make sure that any vents are clear and clean. Gutters and drainage The gutters need to be well-built and securely fastened to the house, with no decay, rust, sagging, or missing pieces. Gutters should also be clean to facilitate good drainage, and the inspector might also check to make sure that the gutters are draining away from the foundation just for good measure. The siding There are many different materials that can be used to construct a house, and the specifics of the inspection are going to depend on the type of siding material used. In general, the inspector is going to look for any stains and signs of damage, ensure that the walls are straight and not bowed, and ensure that there are no cracks in the siding. Vines and flaking or peeling exterior paint are other items that an inspector might look for to ensure the home’s structure is solid. Leaning walls Inside the home, the inspector is going to look at the walls to see if they’re straight or if they happen to tilt one way or another, or whether there are cracks — all signs that the foundation might be problematic. The inspector will also look for any stains or signs of water damage or even smoke damage on the walls, especially if it hasn’t been reported by the seller. Stained ceilings The ceiling should also be level and stain-free, with no cracks, and any trim should be installed properly and in good condition. Again, the inspector is looking for any indication that there might be leaks or water damage happening somewhere in the home, which often manifests on the ceiling. Insulation Inspectors clearly aren’t going to tear open your walls to ensure that there’s insulation and that it’s adequate, but they will look for clues that the walls are well-insulated and that the insulation has been installed correctly. Heating vents Depending on the climate, the inspector is going to check for both heating and cooling sources in habitable rooms; in most of the country, a source of heat will be critical (after all, even in desert climates, it gets pretty cold at night). The fireplace and chimney If you have a working fireplace and chimney, then it might be worth having an additional and more in-depth inspection done to ensure there aren’t any issues with it, but the home inspector will take a brief look at the fireplace to check for cracks or damages, and will typically shine a light around to make sure the flue is clean and lined. Range hood or exhaust fan The range hood or exhaust fan in the kitchen need to be checked so the inspector can ensure that the fan or hood is vented to the outside of the building and that either the hood or fan (or both) is working correctly. Outlets by the kitchen sink Any electrical outlets by the kitchen sink will need to be checked for a ground fault circuit interrupter, a safety precaution, so you can expect the inspector to spend some extra time and attention on those outlets. The kitchen sink itself Water flow, leaks, and stains are going to be top priorities for the inspector when checking out the kitchen sink; the inspector will spend some time looking underneath the sink for any signs of leaks or stains, and will check for rust or deterioration in any garbage disposals or in general around the sink. Built-in appliances Does the dishwasher drain properly and close all the way, and does it leak? Does the stove, range, and any other built-in appliances operate properly? The inspector will look for any signs of problems in the kitchen appliances and note them in the report. Cabinets and drawers If kitchen cabinets or drawers don’t open or close correctly, or all the way, this can be another sign that the foundation or stability of the house could be compromised. The inspector will ensure that the cabinets and drawers are in good condition and that everything opens and closes the way it should. Toilets Not only should toilets operate correctly — flushing when you press the flush mechanism — but toilets should also be securely fastened to the floor: no rocking or looseness, and there shouldn’t be any stains around the base of the toilet. Inspectors will check all of those factors for each toilet in the house. Drains Inspectors will check drains in sinks, tubs, and showers throughout the house to check for any blockages or potential issues, and inspectors will also check the drainage pipes that lead to the sewage or septic system to ensure that the pipe slopes appropriately and that there is no evidence of leaks or stains around the drain pipes. Showers and tubs As you’ve no doubt learned by now, water can present a serious problem if it’s somewhere it’s not supposed to be in the house, and showers and tubs are a danger zone for water leaks and issues. Inspectors will check to make sure the walls, tiles, flooring, and caulking is stable and in good condition, and that there are no stains or signs of leaks around the tub or shower; inspectors will also check the shower or tub’s drainage. Pipes If there’s any visible damage to the plumbing pipes, or it looks like there are stains on the materials around the pipes, those are two indications that the plumbing might need some attention before the sale closes, so you can expect the inspector to check for those. Water heaters The size of the water heater is one thing that inspectors will check to make sure is correct for the size of the home and the number of bedrooms and bathrooms in the house, but inspectors will be looking for more than that — signs of rust and proper ventilation included. Water temperature and pressure Hot water should be hot, but not too hot; inspectors will check the water temperature and pressure to ensure that the water heater works and that there’s adequate pressure for the home. (Sellers may want to set their heater to between 118 and 125 degrees Fahrenheit if they happen to have it hotter than that, so the inspector doesn’t have to do any investigation into why the water is too hot — or even worse, come back a second time after the temperature has been adjusted.) Visible wiring Visible wiring isn’t a dealbreaker in and of itself, but it needs to be appropriately wired and cared for — there should be no visible splices, and any cables should be secured and protected. If the visible wiring is in good condition, then you should be all set. Electrical panels Some electrical panels don’t have adequate capacity for the size of home they’re servicing — a scary but true fact. Inspectors will make sure that the panel is sufficient for the size of the house and will also make sure there are no overheated fuses or breakers, in addition to checking the connections of any cables running into the panel. Electrical outlets The inspector will look to see if there’s an adequate number of outlets in each habitable room, for starters, but you can also expect the inspector to spot-check outlets here and there to see if they’re working properly, and to ensure they’re of the correct three-pronged type. Light switches Light switches might seem like a small thing to worry about, but inspectors will nonetheless check to make sure that the light switches are working in the house. Sellers should do a self-check before the inspection and swap out any problematic light bulbs, and possibly even label a light switch if it connects to an outlet (with a floor lamp, for example) instead of an overhead light. Smoke and carbon monoxide detectors It might get loud when the inspector checks the smoke and carbon monoxide detectors, but of course, you’d rather know those are working well before the house sells. Expect the inspector to check and even trigger the alarms to make sure everything is in good working order. Floors and stairways Inspectors will determine whether floors are level and look for any cracks, stains, or signs of damage; the inspector will also want to make sure that stairs have hand railings (if necessary) and that the treads and risers are solid, with no loose boards or other issues that might literally trip someone up. Garage doors In addition to checking for structural issues and leaks in the garage, inspectors will want to make sure the garage door is in good working condition — it opens and closes with no problems, and that automatic garage doors stop where they’re supposed to stop. If it sounds like there’s a lot involved in a home inspection, well, there is! The inspection is one part of the process that’s helpful for both buyers and sellers in terms of protecting everyone’s interests, so ask for references (and even a sample inspection report) when choosing an inspector, and do your best to be present for the event itself so you can hear firsthand about any issues uncovered. (Originally published – Realtor.com)
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How are we doing?

How are we doing?

"Good Morning! I want to tell you about a wonderful asset you have on your team.. Scott Theis! You see when i contacted him I  was at my wits end, had rented for years a terrible apt with a landlord from you know where! I had heard horror stories about buying a house so I never wanted to be in that situation but here I was. From the second I heard his upbeat, encouraging voice my my fears subsided. Scott was more than a realtor he was part of the family who cared about what I needed not just interested in selling a house! Due to my back injury Scott toured the houses for me, he took the time to know what I needed. He didn't just work on my house 9-5, he also worked evenings and weekends until we had the perfect home. Even the paperwork was a snap ( not a stubborn computer and my inept computer skills could slow him down!) Scott knew I desperate needed out of my situation and he created a miracle for me in record speed! His compassion, professionalism, dedication and genuine honesty is a breath of fresh air. If you are interested in buying a house and getting the right one Scott is your guy! Thank you for having such a wonderful representative to stand for your company, Scott is the best!"

-Chris Messer

As the owner and Broker of Stutesman's Action Realty - I understand that hard work & persistence is necessary and a duty of an agent assisting their clients. Thank you - Scott Theis for going the distance to assist & protect your clients best interest.

how are we doing
Scott Theis, Kim Messer, Nathan Mayberry